Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Reconnecting to Human Rights Through Art in Canada's 6th National Museum

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Introduction

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights started construction in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 2009. Originally planned to open in 2013, the museum finally opened on September 19, 2014, but certain exhibits remained closed. The Canadian Museum for Human Rights started construction in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 2009. Originally planned to open in 2013, the museum finally opened on September 19, 2014, but certain exhibits remained closed. Construction started in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 2009. The Canadian Museum for Human Rights is a non-profit organisation that promotes human rights in Canada. Originally planned to open in 2013, the museum finally opened on September 19, 2014, but certain exhibits remained closed. The museum is a one-of-a-kind endeavour dedicated to exploring the global subject of human rights, with a particular emphasis on human rights in the context of Canada. Its mission is to "increase public awareness of human rights, foster respect for others, and stimulate thought and discussion."

Musée canadien pour les droits de la personne

Logo of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.png
Established 13 March 2008 ; 13 years ago ( 2008-03-13 )
Location The Forks , Winnipeg , Manitoba , Canada
Type Human rights museum
Visitors 295,300 (2016/17) [1]
Founder Izzy Asper and The Asper Foundation
President Isha Khan
Owner Government of Canada [2]
Website www .humanrights .ca

Building details

Canadian Museum for Human Rights under Construction 03.JPG

CMHR, October 2012

General information
Groundbreaking December 19, 2008
Construction started 2009
Cost $501 million
Height
Observatory 100 m (328.08 ft)
Technical details
Material alabaster , basalt rock , glass, Tyndall limestone , steel
Floor count 8
Floor area 24,155 m 2 (5.97 acres)
Lifts/elevators 2
Design and construction
Architect Antoine Predock
Awards and prizes 14 national & international awards related to its architecture and construction
Other information
Number of restaurants 1 (ERA Bistro)
 
Agency overview
Type Crown corporation
Minister responsible
Key document
  • The Museums Act

 

History

The museum was envisioned by media mogul Israel (Izzy) Asper, who formed a foundation to build the museum in 2003, and was brought to completion by the efforts of members of the Asper family as well as many other people involved. The museum's primary premise is that it will be a place where people can learn about human rights via creative teaching methods. The establishment of a national student travel programme, which will attract over 20,000 students to the museum each year, will be a highlight. The decision to locate the museum in Winnipeg is important. Winnipeg has been involved in a number of significant historical events, such as the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike, that have influenced the development of the Canadian civil rights movement, especially in regard to the progress of Aboriginal peoples, women, French speakers, and workers' rights. It also has one of Canada's most varied communities, including francophone, First Nations, and Métis populations as well as a thriving immigrant community.

Galleries

The Canadian Museum of Human Rights has 11 exhibits that address a broad range of human rights topics, including: (1) What are Human Rights? (2) Indigenous Perspectives, (3) Canadian Journeys, (4) Protecting Rights in Canada, (5) Examining the Holocaust, (6) Turning Points for Humanity, (7) Breaking the Silence, (8) Actions Count, (9) Rights Today, (10) Inspiring Change, and (11) Expressions are some of the topics covered. A commissioned piece by Ojibwa Rebecca Belmore, Trace (2014), a multi-storey, handmade ceramic blanket that is part of a series of works addressing the continuing painful history of Aboriginal peoples, is shown in the Indigenous Perspectives exhibit. Residential schools, the forcible evacuation of the Inuit, Japanese Canadian incarceration during WWII, the Underground Railroad Komagata Maru, and the Winnipeg General Strike are all included in Canadian Journeys. Examining the Holocaust looks at other genocides as well, including the Holodomor (the Ukrainian famine of 1932–33), the Armenian genocide, the Rwandan genocide, and the ethnic cleansing in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

A National Museum

Canadian Museum for Human Rights

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights, designed by American architect Antoine Predock, is Canada's sixth national museum and the first since 1967. Furthermore, it is the first national museum outside of the National Capital Region in Canada's history. The formation of the Friends of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights was an essential part of the CMHR's growth. Friends of the CMHR is a registered organisation that was established in 2002 as a cooperative collaboration between the public and private sectors to lead the development of the new museum and to oversee the capital campaign to attract private sector financing. The Canadian Museum for Human Rights is part of the Canadian Heritage Portfolio, and the Minister of Canadian Heritage reports to Parliament.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *